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Wildlife and Exotics

 

Attitudes of the Michigan Public and Wildlife Agency Personnel toward Lethal Wildlife Management

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It is important for advocates to understand public attitudes on the issues they are tackling. This study sheds light on when the public (and wildlife officials) think killing wildlife is acceptable. The results showed strong public support in Michigan for the seven instances of lethal wildlife management that were tested, which ranged from those of benefit to humans, the environment, and other species. Residents were most likely to support lethal measures to control wildlife diseases (89%) and least supportive of their use in providing humans with opportunities to hunt or trap for food (56%).

An Evaluation of Exercise Pen Use by Circus Tigers (Pathera tigris tigris)

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In this study circus tigers were given access to an exercise pen while on tour in California and their behavior observed. Not surprisingly, these big cats made use of the pen, particularly during the day. Also not surprisingly however is that access to the pen did not eliminate their stereotypic pacing and the tigers spent over half their time in the pen lying down.



Specific Image Characteristics Influence Attitudes about Chimpanzee Conservation and Use as Pets

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This study examined how attitudes towards chimpanzees varied based on the type of characteristics present in images of this great ape. Survey respondents were less likely to perceive wild chimpanzee populations as endangered when presented with an image of a chimpanzee alongside a human or an image of a chimpanzee in a human setting. Human presence also increased the chances that chimpanzees would be perceived as suitable companion animals, whereas images of a chimpanzee in a zoo-like setting were less likely than other settings to result in them being considered appealing companions. Advocates may find this study useful in understanding how inaccurate characterizations of chimpanzees can influence public perceptions.

More Evidence of Increasing Fur Sales

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This brief press release highlights figures produced by the International Fur Trade Federation regarding fur sales in 2010. Overall, international fur sales increased between 2009 and 2010 to over $14 billion. (Includes chart with annual sales data from 1999 to 2010.)




Pelt Production Up 9 Percent

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This brief report by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) details the state of the mink industry in 2011. In total, mink breeding, pelt production, number of mink farmers, and amount of money made from pelts increased in 2011 over 2010. The total number of mink pelts produced (i.e., the minimum number of mink killed for fur) was 3.1 million in 2011.



Assessing Impacts of Land-Applied Manure from Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations on Fish Populations and Communities

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Manure runoff from concentrated animal farming operations in Indiana is impacting the reproduction and gender of wild fish, according to this study. The hormone-laden waste contaminates local waterways, leading to 60% of fish embryos being male (in a control setting with fish in uncontaminated water, the ration was close to 50:50). The study's authors and other fish experts worry that the contaminants may lead to a decline in fish populations. Additionally, waterways contaminated by animal farms had 50% less fish diversity and a 28% higher adult minnow death rate when compared to the uncontaminated waterway.

Determining Adrenocortical Activity as a Measure of Stress in African Elephants in Relation to Human Activities

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This study of elephants residing inside and outside of protected areas found significantly lower levels of stress for those elephants residing within parks and reserves. Using fecal samples found within and outside of protected areas, researchers measured higher fecal glucocorticoid metabolites levels in elephants outside of the protected areas, indicative of higher stress. The authors conclude that "the reason for the higher (stress) level in the high-risk areas (is) thought to be a result of long-ongoing hunting activity, which has led the animals to associate humans and vehicles with detrimental effects."

WSPA's Investigation into the Global Fur Trade: Things We Need to Know

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This article summarizes facts and statistics about fur farming and the fur trade internationally. The report highlights laws banning certain types of fur farming and how many animals are killed for fur. The report shows that most fur (85%) is produced on fur farms. Excluding rabbits, an estimated 50 million animals are killed on fur farms each year. If rabbits are included the number of animals killed on fur farms is thought to be over one billion.


Idaho Residents' and Sportsmen's Opinions on Wildlife Management and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game

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This survey found that 91% of Idaho residents consider the state’s abundant wildlife an important reason to live there. The overwhelming majority of Idaho residents (90%) approve of legal hunting, nearly all respondents (97%) approve of legal and recreational fishing, and a majority approve of legal trapping (61%). A majority of residents (60%) also believes that hunting and fishing are part of the scientific management of wildlife. During the past two years, 78% of Idaho residents have watched or photographed wildlife while only 53% have gone fishing and only 35% have gone hunting.

Global Fur Trade Now Worth $15 Billion

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This article from March 2012 includes figures released by the International Fur Trade Federation revealing an increase in fur sales of 7% from 2010-2011 and 70% since 2000/2001. While fur sales have increased in most areas (including a "rebound" in the United States), the growth is highest in Asia.



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