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Wildlife and Exotics

 

Animals Taken by Wildlife Services (Fiscal Year 2011)

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This list provides data from the U.S. Wildlife Services (a program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture) regarding the number of animals killed by the agency in 2011. The data is provided by species and state; in total, Wildlife Services killed nearly 4 million animals in 2011.




The Return of the Fur Coat: A Commodity Chain Perspective

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This report analyses the fur industry from an economic perspective, tracing the history of the fur coat. The author argues that the fur coat has shifted over time to embrace both mainstream production but to also symbolize craftsmanship, allowing it to be sold as a luxury fashion item. The author also makes arguments as to why and how the fur industry became a target of the animal protection movement, why they succeeded in diminishing fur sales, and how the fur industry was able to bounce back.

Bonobos Share with Strangers

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Sharing is thought by many to be a uniquely human concept, along with the belief that non-human animals are driven by self-serving interests. However, this study (based on experiments with wild-born primates in a sanctuary setting) shows that bonobos are anything but selfish and will share food with complete strangers, even more often than with members of the same group. According to the authors, the sharing seems predicated on the possibility of new social interactions.

2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation

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This study is based on interviews with U.S. residents about fishing, hunting, and wildlife watching. The report focuses on 2011 participation and related expenditures for people age 16 years and older. The report also includes trend data for hunting, fishing, and wildlife watching by comparing with past surveys dating from 1991. From 2006-2011, hunting participation increased by 11%, fishing participation by 9%, and wildlife watching participation by 3%.

Problem-Elephant Translocation: Translocating the Problem and the Elephant?

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Elephants are often moved to different areas to reduce the potential for human-elephant conflict (HEC). This study sought to understand the outcomes for 16 Asian elephants relocated to national parks in Sri Lanka. The results showed that two elephants died in the parks, but most left the parks, resulting in an increase of HEC. The authors conclude that relocating "problem" elephants only increases the likelihood of conflict with humans.


US Mink: State of the Industry – 2011

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This report by Fur Commission USA details the state of the fur industry at the end of the year, 2011. Production in the U.S. in 2010 was found to be generally on par with previous years. Globally, just over 50% of all farmed mink are reared in Denmark and China, which produced 15 million and 13.5 million pelts, respectively.


Animal Welfare Aspects of the Killing and Skinning of Seals: Scientific Opinion of the Panel on Animal Health and Welfare

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This report summarizes data about seal hunting, including methods of killing seals and the number of seals killed by country. In all over 750,000 seals are killed each year, primarily in Canada, Greenland and Namibia. The report summarizes scientific data regarding whether the methods for killing seals are appropriate. The report concludes that seals are sentient animals and that must be taken into consideration when they are being killed.


Dying for Fur: A Report on the Fur Industry in China

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Investigators went inside of Chinese fur farms to ascertain the condition of animals on these farms, as China is the largest exporter of fur. This is the first report of its kind; the original report was conducted in 2004-2005 with updates made to the report in 2007. The investigation revealed that animals were kept in inhumane conditions and many were skinned while still alive; some animals remained conscious five to ten minutes after their skin had been removed.


Fur Trapper Survey 2009-2010 (Wisconsin)

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This survey details trapping in Wisconsin in the 2009-2010 trapping season based on a survey of resident trapping and conservation license holders who were also trappers. The survey found that 53% of license holders actively trapped in the 2009-10 season, an average of 30 days each.



Non-Target Trapping Incidents

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Trapping not only catches the targeted animals, but it may catch, kill, or injure other animals, including companion animals and humans. This database by Born Free USA keeps track of incidents where non-target animals are effected by traps. The data is obtained by self-reports so it is incomplete, yet it paints an important picture of many of the dangers trapping poses and the cruelty of trapping. This information may be important to animal advocates working on issues addressing, wildlife management, fur, and trapping.

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