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Research Tools and Methods

 

Alternatives to Animal Testing: A Review

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This article presents an overview of benefits of and techniques to reduce the number of animals used in animal testing for medical purposes, to improve living and test conditions when animals are used, and to remove animals entirely from testing processes. In vitro experimentation, computer analysis and modeling, and the replacement of mammals with "lower," non-mammalian species, insects, and microorganisms are discussed. The authors conclude that utilization of these alternatives can reduce the number of animals used in animal testing while producing dependable results.

Disease Control through Fertility Control: Secondary Benefits of Animal Birth Control in Indian Street Dogs

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In this study, free-roaming sexually intact dogs in urban northwestern India were captured, tested for diseases, and assigned a body condition score. The results were compared across three cities with varying levels of animal birth control (ABC) programs. For 7 out of 10 conditions, including fight wounds, body condition, and diseases, there was a positive correlation between dog health and the presence of an ABC program, even for dogs who were sexually intact. The authors argue that ABC programs impact the entire dog population, as sterilization reduces mating-related fighting, population pressures and opportunities for disease transmission, benefiting wildlife and humans as well as dogs.

Survey of Attitudes Toward, Conflicts with and Management of Wolves and Bears in Rural Villages in Armenia

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For her Masters thesis, the author performed a baseline study of human-bear and human-wolf conflicts in rural Armenia. In individual interviews and focus groups, participants from 23 rural villages were surveyed on their attitudes towards wolves and bears, frequency and type of conflict events, contributing factors, conflict mitigation strategies used, and current and proposed options for management of conflicts. While almost half of the participants expressed respect or concern for wolves and bears, slightly more than half felt frustrated by conflicts, and unable to adequately protect themselves or their property. Government management policies were not perceived as helpful. The author concluded that implementation of a community-based management program combined with education would empower residents while minimizing conflict-related killing of wolves and bears.

How to Decide Whether to Move Species Threatened by Climate Change

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This article proposes a framework to perform rigorous, quantitative cost/benefit analysis of proposals to relocate plant and animal species threatened by climate change. The framework is consistent with the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s guidelines, and can be used to evaluate a single proposed relocation, to compare species as well as strategies or locations, and to focus future research by pinpointing areas where data is insufficient.



Year of the Thoughtful Advocate

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Knowledge is power. In a world where animal suffering is common and animal-based industries make billions of dollars, the best tool that animal advocates have is information… to find sympathetic audiences, make compelling arguments, identify effective tactics, and measure our impact. Without this knowledge, we may just be treading water, and animals deserve better.

A Rising Tide Lifts All Boats

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The Humane Research Council is a very different kind of animal group. We save animals by helping advocates be more effective and use their limited resources as wisely as possible. Our work helps lift all animal protection efforts to new levels through our free resources, deeply discounted services, and collaborative research studies. Please be a part of this important mission by making a contribution to HRC today so we can continue providing live-saving research.

What People are Saying About HRC

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The Humane Research Council does a lot with very little. Our team of just two paid staffers helps thousands of animal advocates every year, including small animal groups, students and scholars, and individual advocates. As you think about which organizations to support with your end-of-year donations, please consider the following quotes from people that HRC has helped through client projects, one-on-one support, and our research website, HumaneSpot.org. We appreciate any support you can provide.

What small animal group will we help next?

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Grassroots advocacy is the heart and soul of the animal protection movement. But small animal groups are sorely underfunded; they rely mostly on volunteer time and donated resources. We’re excited to announce that HRC will be accepting new applications for the Grassroots Research Fund starting in January! But we can’t do this alone. We’re committing $2,500, but we urgently need your help to match that amount to provide another grassroots project in 2014. Can you donate today?

Statistics Without Borders Offering Free Assistance to Animal Advocates

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Statistics Without Borders provides entirely pro bono statistical help for data analysis, survey planning, and related activities and is interested in working with animal advocates and animal protection organizations. In addition to providing direct assistance (with both basic and advanced statistical analysis), SWB also trains individuals in statistics and statistical programming.



Evaluation of Excess Significance Bias in Animal Studies of Neurological Diseases

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This paper brings into question the literature on animal studies and neurological disorders. The authors reviewed more than 4,000 studies on the topic and concluded that there was an excess of studies with statistically significant results, which suggests strong biases in the literature.





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